WHO’S THAT GIRL? CHRISTINA HENDRICKS












Here is a look at one of the reasons (as men tell it), “Mad Men” is one of the most watched shows on television, Christina Hendricks. I’ve been hooked on the show since the first time I watched, but I must admit, I really enjoyed seeing “Big Red” every week. Here’s her biography.

Christina Hendricks (born May 3, 1975) is an American actress best known for her starring role as Joan Holloway in the AMC cable television series Mad Men, and as Saffron in Fox’s short lived series Firefly.

Hendricks was born in Knoxville, Tennessee and raised in Twin Falls, Idaho from third through eighth grade. In 1989, her family moved to Fairfax, Virginia, where Hendricks appeared in several high school plays and local community theater. She got her start acting in Junior Musical Playhouse productions, including Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Hendricks is a natural blonde; she has been dyeing her hair red since she was 10 years old.

As an actress, Hendricks has made her mark in a number of guest TV appearances. Her first television break came when she became a regular in the series Beggars & Choosers. Since then, she has starred in the series The Big Time and The Court, opposite Sally Field and Craig Bierko, as well as the law drama Kevin Hill. She has also had recurring roles in ER and Firefly and guest-starred in episodes of Angel, Miss Match, Tru Calling, Presidio Med, Without a Trace, and Las Vegas. Hendricks starred opposite Kip Pardue in South of Pico. She has appeared in four episodes of the NBC TV show Life in the recurring role of Olivia, detective Charlie Crews’ soon-to-be stepmother and Ted Earley’s love interest.

Her best-known role is that of Joan Holloway on the Emmy- and Golden Globe- winning AMC series Mad Men. The show centers on the macho, booze-soaked world of advertising in New York City in the early 1960s. Hendricks’ character is the office manager of Sterling Cooper, providing dubious mentoring to a group of women who must deal with the come-ons and callousness of professional advertising executives. –Source

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